Project Entry 2014 for Asia Pacific

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    Project Entry 2014 Asia Pacific - In-Situ Network: Palm tree branches for coastal protection, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati

    “Target issues” for sustainable construction.

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    Project Entry 2014 Asia Pacific - In-Situ Network: Palm tree branches for coastal protection, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati

    Palm tree branch as construction material for coastal protection.

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    Project Entry 2014 Asia Pacific - In-Situ Network: Palm tree branches for coastal protection, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati

    Material system: structure and performance. Palm branches have an ideal ”spoon” shape which enables a sea current to slow down and deposit sand material in the concave area of the unit. In this way mounds of sand deposit are created, which gradually create a higher coastline. During the process, the palm branch transforms to “geoarmature”, which is able to host aquatic plants, like mangroves.

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    Project Entry 2014 Asia Pacific - In-Situ Network: Palm tree branches for coastal protection, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati

    Tarawa atoll as an indicator for future events around the globe.

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    Project Entry 2014 Asia Pacific - In-Situ Network: Palm tree branches for coastal protection, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati

    Photos from construction site, where building material is usually seen as a waste material.

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    Project Entry 2014 Asia Pacific - In-Situ Network: Palm tree branches for coastal protection, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati

    Main “spoon-shaped” unit in the network.

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    Project Entry 2014 Asia Pacific - In-Situ Network: Palm tree branches for coastal protection, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati

    Structure and performance of the main construction unit.

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    Project Entry 2014 Asia Pacific - In-Situ Network: Palm tree branches for coastal protection, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati

    Regular grid for unit organization: The number, density, and orientation depends upon specific location.

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    Project Entry 2014 Asia Pacific - In-Situ Network: Palm tree branches for coastal protection, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati

    Site-specific grid which forms a site-specific morphology.

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    Project Entry 2014 Asia Pacific - In-Situ Network: Palm tree branches for coastal protection, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati

    Resilient coastline.

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    Project Entry 2014 Asia Pacific - In-Situ Network: Palm tree branches for coastal protection, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati

    Maj Plemenitas

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    Project Entry 2014 Asia Pacific - In-Situ Network: Palm tree branches for coastal protection, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati

    Ana Abram

Last updated: March 31, 2014 Tarawa Atoll, kiribati

Progress: The project is focused on innovative material use and design solutions for endangered coastal areas in tropical and subtropical climates. The strategy is resilient, comprehensive and systematic in order to ensure simplicity of deployment and effective function. Due to the overall simplicity and reliance on locally-available materials the concept is highly transferable, affordable and broadly applicable.

People: Although the project’s primary focus is aimed to provide fundamental living condition and basic needs for people that live in vulnerable coastal areas, the scope that the project effectively covers is much broader. It builds with the values and skills of local communities, creating adaptable and stimulating environments. The collective approach is extremely important in all phases of design, construction and the entire life cycle of the project.

Planet: The project is designed to have an extremely low ecological impact both in terms of material used for construction – the project utilizes the palm leaf stems that are usually a waste material that a palm tree periodically sheds, during the construction, as no heavy machinery or power tools are needed, and during the effective lifespan, when the heterogeneous network structure relies on robust design and shape of the unit and its position while all the energy needed for construction is provided passively through the water flow. Materials used are locally available and affordable, very durable, fully recyclable and renewable. The network provides a protective environment and habitat for a large number of birds and fish supporting and promoting biodiversity.

Prosperity: Due to strategic use of best possible natural materials that is at the same time considered waste product and are practically free of charge, we are able to eliminate any direct building material related expenses. The efficient design and implementation process with its broad spectrum of direct and indirect economic benefits for the involved communities provides a resilient long-term investment and at the same time open up possibilities for cultural and know-how exchange.

Place: Simple and resilient. The material system creates coexistence with the landscape, through multi-objective design and passive construction processes.