Clinic of Care in Indonesia

Cultural adaptation of vernacular housing in Java

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Social housing to improve worker conditions

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    Ad Rem: Adaptation in Architecture

    On the Indonesian island of Java, the Joglo is an unmistakable typology. Distinguished by their instantly recognizable high-pitched roof shape – which is among the most complex of Javanese vernacular styles – these traditional houses were a ubiquitous presence.

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    Ad Rem: Adaptation in Architecture

    Joglo structures are often regarded as both culturally and technologically obsolete, and are typically burdened by high maintenance costs. Today, they are increasingly threatened by erasure.

Supported via a newly launched Holcim Foundation grant program, an inaugural group of Next Generation Ambassadors is exploring the opportunities and challenges of architectural transformation.

By Namjoo Kim - Studio DOHGAM, Seoul, South Korea; Stefan Novakovic; Andi Subagio - SASO Architecture Studio, Jakarta, Indonesia

On the Indonesian island of Java, the Joglo is an unmistakable typology. Distinguished by their instantly recognizable high-pitched roof shape – which is among the most complex of Javanese vernacular styles – these traditional houses were a ubiquitous presence. They are vessels of history and cultural memory, with a centuries-old architectural language shaped by spiritual beliefs, religious customs and social hierarchies. In the 21st century, however, Joglo structures are often regarded as both culturally and technologically obsolete, and are typically burdened by high maintenance costs. Today, they are increasingly threatened by erasure.

Next Generation Accelerator (NGX) Workshop 2022

Andi Subagio is a Next Generation Ambassador of the Holcim Foundation and Principal Architect at SASO Architecture Studio based in Jakarta, Indonesia.

For design practitioners, meaningful preservation is equally contingent on spatial problem-solving and cultural sensitivity. To successfully adapt these heritage typologies (traditionally associated with Javanese aristocrats) into new contexts, architectural solutions must do more than create functional spaces. How can Joglo structures transform to meet contemporary needs and economic realities? Can reuse be accomplished in a manner that reflects changing social and cultural norms while preserving inherent historical value – and minimizing carbon costs?

Next Generation Accelerator (NGX) Workshop 2022

Namjoo Kim is a Next Generation Ambassador of the Holcim Foundation, an architect, and Co-Founder of Studio DOHGAM based in Seoul, South Korea.

Exploring Architectural Transformation 

Supported via a newly launched Holcim Foundation grant program, an inaugural group of Next Generation Ambassadors is exploring the opportunities and challenges of architectural transformation. Led by Andi Subagio and Namjoo Kim with Stefan Novakovic, Clinic of Care: Indonesia integrates a community-oriented building project with a research-based examination of culturally attuned adaptive reuse.

The Holcim Foundation’s Next Generation Ambassadors are collaborating on a project in the village of Mutihan Madurejo in Java’s Yogyakarta region. Clinic of Care: Indonesia will support the restoration and adaptation of an abandoned Joglo structure into a rehearsal space and cultural venue for a traditional dance collective. Working in close collaboration with the Sekar Jagad Foundation and the architectural faculty at Indonesia’s Universitas Pelita Harapan, the project will combine a post-secondary research and design studio (facilitated by Subagio and Kim) with an inclusive construction workshop that brings together architectural students, local stakeholders and community members.   

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