Evolutionary Infrastructure

Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities

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    Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA

    The site is seen in red along the coast of San Francisco. The concept of an elevated street allows for a dense, mixed footprint. In yellow are important contextual landmarks. The program diagram shows the approximate size and composition of each “program block” inserted along the parking ramp. Their composition is based on logical immediate adjacencies in the vertical direction, and an even distribution of program along the ramp: thus creating the street without forgoing functional efficiency.

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    Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA

    A day lighting study provided the rules for removing a central portion of each floor plate, utilizing the most efficient sun angles throughout the day. An open air atrium is created serving to develop an experiential quality that does not seek to hide the former infrastructure, but instead glorify its natural aesthetics. The folded plate music hall is then visually connected both outside and in: sitting in the unavoidable shadow lines of adjacent buildings.

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    Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA

    A view from a neighboring building shows the open air atrium and the garden spaces provided.

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    Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA

    Public gardens are located on the upper levels to alleviate the hardscaped urban environment.

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    Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA

    Wind currents off the water are used in stack ventilation. The program blocks are seen in elevation.

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    Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA

    The entry lobby to the music hall shows the use of existing structure as architectural detail.

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    Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA

    New openings throughout the structure connect programs like the art gallery and restaurant seen here.

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    Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA

    Vertical adjacencies create immediate connections while distributing programs along a continuous path.

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    Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA

    The back of house stacks vertically, connecting green room, backstage and more via private elevator.

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    Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA

    The music hall takes advantage of the existing floor levels to create balcony seating.

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    Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada

    Congratulating “Next Generation” 5th prize winner for “Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, USA” (l-r): Enrique Norten, Member of the Board of the Holcim Foundation and Principal & Founder of TEN Arquitectos; winners Mark Jongman-Sereno, Harvard University; Mira Irawan, New York University; David O’Brian, Iowa State University; and jury member Jeffrey Laberge, Associate, JL Richards & Associates, Sudbury, Canada.

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    “Sustainability? Reducing the footprint” – Mark Jongman-Sereno

    “Next Generation” 5th prize-winner “Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, USA” takes a fallow parking garage that is re-used for cultural programs.

  • Next generation Next Generation 5th prize 2014–2015 North America

This project explores the concept and potential of adaptive post-occupation of unused infrastructure.   Using a parking garage the scheme proposes to convert the “found” structure – an “objet trouvé” in the city, so to speak – into a public building hosting a range of cultural activities. The stacked floors of the garage and its circulation ramp are literally re-used to accommodate new functions.

By Mira Irawan, - New York University (NYU), New York, NY, USADavid O’Brien, - Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USAMark Turibius Jongman-Sereno - Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA

Ideas: Circular Design

This project explores the concept and potential of adaptive post-occupation of unused infrastructure. Using a parking garage the scheme proposes to convert the “found” structure – an “objet trouvé” in the city, so to speak – into a public building hosting a range of cultural activities.

The stacked floors of the garage and its circulation ramp are literally re-used to accommodate new functions.

Evolutionary Infrastructure

Project authors

  • Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
    Mira Irawan

    New York University (NYU)

    USA

  • Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
    David O’Brien

    Iowa State University

    USA

  • Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
    Mark Turibius Jongman-Sereno

    Harvard University

    USA

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